Beauty

How to Dye Your Hair: 13 Expert Tips for Coloring Your Hair at Home

So what does that mean for you when you’re standing in the aisle at the drugstore? If your hair is frizzy or curly, pick a color that’s warm (golden, copper, bronze), but a little lighter than your natural hair color; if your hair is fine and straight, choose cooler shades (champagne, beige) that are slightly darker than your natural color.

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5. Touch up your roots — and only your roots.

“If you’re just doing your roots, I’d recommend putting coconut oil or a deep conditioning mask on the mid-shaft and ends to help preserve any lightness or any dimension that you have on the hair,” says NYC-based colorist Rachel Bodt. Runoff from rinsing out your roots can stain the rest of your hair, so she suggests creating a coconut oil barrier to keep dye from dripping down through the rest of your hair. She also suggests adding Vaseline around the hairline to prevent dye from staining your scalp.

6. Rethink your tools.

If you’re an unnatural blonde, box dyes won’t hide the dark roots of your highlights, since they’re meant to adjust hair color by only a shade or two, says colorist Marie Robinson, the founder of Marie Robinson Salon in New York City. “Get an at-home bleach kit, like Clairol Born Blonde, instead, and use a spooley to apply to just the highlights’ roots.” The makeup tool disperses bleach evenly and precisely, so you’re less likely to end up with “hot” (hairstylist speak for orange) color.

If you have grown-out highlights on top of base color, apply hair color to your roots, then use a wide-tooth comb to feather the dye slightly over the start of your highlights, says Nikki Lee, a colorist and founder of Nine Zero One salon in Los Angeles. “That’ll soften the harsh lines a bit.” She recommends using a shade of dye that matches your roots or is just a smidge lighter.

Photographed by Kim Reenberg

7. Consider spot-treating.

If you’re targeting grays, you don’t have to dye your whole head. “If you have a gray headband along your hairline, get a semipermanent dye and only color that area,” says colorist Rita Hazan, the founder of Rita Hazan Salon in New York City. It may mean working strand by strand, adds Robinson, who suggests using an eye shadow brush for extra precision.

8. Section, section, section.

To avoid patchiness, create a middle part that runs to the back of your head and split the hair into four sections — two in front of the ears and two in back. “Be organized about the application,” says Brooke Jordan, head stylist with The Bird House salon in NYC. “People can miss spots, or don’t know how to get the back.” To prevent this, use clips to create four sections and work through them front to back.

9. Add shampoo.

If your ends are very dry and you’re dyeing your entire head, don’t put dye on your ends. Instead, three minutes before you’re supposed to rinse, add two squirts of shampoo into the dye left in the bottle. Shake it up and apply the mixture to your ends. “It dilutes the dye but still gives you a pinch of color and shine,” says Louis Licari of the Louis Licari Salon in New York City.

10. Let your hair down.

You know how the models in the commercial always have their dye-coated hair artfully twisted up into a bun? Don’t do that. “The color won’t be even when you rinse it out,” says Ionato. “Leave it down until the timer rings.”

11. Add water.

Before you rinse out the color, sprinkle a little water on your head and mush your hair around with your hands for a few seconds. “It emulsifies the dye and moves it all around so you don’t end up with any lines or streaks,” says Ionato.

pPhotographed by Kim Reenbergp
Photographed by Kim Reenberg

12. Tweak the results.

After your hair is dry, if you’re unhappy with the color, you can mute it by applying a deep conditioner to damp hair. Then cover your head with plastic wrap and a hot, damp towel. Leave on for 20 minutes (at 10 minutes, blast your head with a blow-dryer), then shampoo and condition your hair. If you’re still not happy with your shade, well, it looks like you’ll have to head to a salon when you can..

13. You must condition when you’re done.

“If you skip the conditioner step, it leaves the cuticle open and the color keeps working,” says Ionato. “So don’t be surprised if you end up with much darker hair than you wanted.” Don’t throw away the conditioner in the kit, and if you do, make sure to use a deep conditioner in the shower after you rinse out the dye.


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